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List of political parties in the United States

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This is a list of political parties in the United States, both past and present. It does not include independents.

Active parties[edit]

Major parties[edit]

"Major" party support in recent elections
Party Ideology Year
founded
Membership
[1]
Presidential vote[2] Senators
[3]
Representatives[4] Governors
[5]
State legislators
[5]
Legislatures
[5]
Trifectas
[5]
Electoral Popular Voting Nonvoting
Democratic Disc.svg Democratic Party Modern liberalism 1828 47,106,084
306 / 538
81,284,778 (51.27%)
48 / 100
[A]
218 / 435
4 / 6
27 / 55
3,439 / 7,383
18 / 49
15 / 49
Republican Disc.svg Republican Party Conservatism 1854 35,041,482
232 / 538
74,224,501 (46.82%)
50 / 100
212 / 435
2 / 6
28 / 55
3,866 / 7,383
29 / 49
22 / 49

Third parties[edit]

Represented in state legislatures[edit]

"Third" party support in recent elections
Party Ideology Year
founded
Membership[1] Presidential vote (2020)[2] State legislators[5]
Libertarian Disc.svg
Libertarian Party
Libertarianism[6] 1971[7] 693,634 1,865,917 (1.177%)
2 / 7,383
[8][9]
Vermont Progressive Party Progressivism 1981 Unknown
9 / 7,383
Alliance Party (United States) logo.svg
Alliance Party
Centrism[10] 2019 Unknown 88,238 (0.056%)
1 / 7,383
[11]
Independent Party of Oregon Centrism[12] 2007 124,048
1 / 7,383
[13]
Working Families Party logo.svg
Working Families Party
Social democracy[14] 1998 50,532 386,010 (0.243%)[B]
1 / 7,383

Represented in Puerto Rican legislature[edit]

Support for parties in Puerto Rican legislature in recent elections
Party Ideology Year
founded
President Gubernatorial vote Senators Representatives Mayors
Popular Democratic Party
Partido Popular Democrático
Pro-Commonwealth
Liberalism
Social Liberalism
1938 Aníbal José Torres 407,817 (31.75%)
12 / 27
26 / 51
42 / 78
Logo del Partido Nuevo Progresista.svg
New Progressive Party
Partido Nuevo Progresista
Puerto Rico statehood 1967 Thomas Rivera Schatz 427,016 (33.24%)
10 / 27
21 / 51
35 / 78
Movimiento Victoria Ciudadana checkmark.svg
Citizens' Victory Movement
Movimiento Victoria Ciudadana
Anti-imperialism
Anti-neoliberalism
Progressivism
2019 Ana Irma Rivera Lassén 179,265 (13.95%)
2 / 27
2 / 51
0 / 78
PIP new logo.svg
Puerto Rican Independence Party
Partido Independentista Puertorriqueño
Puerto Rico independence
Social democracy
1946 Rubén Berríos 175,402 (13.58%)
1 / 27
1 / 51
0 / 78
Proyecto Dignidad Logo.png
Project Dignity
Proyecto Dignidad
Christian democracy
Anti-corruption
2019 César Váquez Muñiz 87,379 (6.80%)
1 / 27
1 / 51
0 / 78

Not represented in Congress, state legislatures, or territorial legislatures[edit]

Other national parties, with support in recent elections
Party Ideology Year
founded
Membership[1] Presidential vote (2020)[2]
Green Disc.svg
Green Party
Environmentalism
Eco-socialism[15][16]
2001[17] 246,377 404,090 (0.255%)
Conservative Party of New York Logo.png
Conservative Party of New York State
Conservatism[18] 1962 147,606 295,657 (0.186%)[B]
Party for Socialism and Liberation Logo.svg
Party for Socialism and Liberation
Marxism–Leninism[19] 2004[20] 606 (FL) 85,488 (0.054%)
American Independent Party Paleoconservatism[21] 1967 600,220 (CA) 60,160 (0.038%)[B]
Constitution Party Paleoconservatism[22] 1992[20] 118,088 60,066 (0.038%)
Peace and Freedom Party Socialism[23] 1967 94,016 51,037 (0.032%)[B]
American Solidarity Party Christian democracy[24]
Social democracy[25]
2011[24] Unknown 38,614 (0.024%)
Cannabis leaf.svg
Legal Marijuana Now Party
Marijuana legalization[26] 1998 Unknown 10,033 (0.006%)[B]
Socialist Workers Party Castroism[27] 1938 298 (DE/KY) 6,791 (0.004%)
Unity Party of America logo (2021).svg
Unity Party
Centrism[28] 2004 1,657 (CO) 6,647 (0.004%)
Reform Party Radical centrism[29] 1995 6,665 5,966 (0.004%)[B]
Oregon Progressive Party Progressivism[30] 2007 2,292 5,404 (0.003%)
Prohibition Party Temperance[31] 1869 36[32] 4,856 (0.003%)
Natural Law Party Transcendental Meditation[33] 1992 6,657 (NJ) 2,986 (0.002%)[B]
Approval Voting Party Electoral reform[34] 2016 1,149 (CO) 409 (0.0003%)
Socialist Equality Party Trotskyism[35] 1966 Unknown 351 (0.0002%)
Peace sign.svg
Liberty Union Party
Democratic socialism[36] 1970 Unknown 166 (0.0001%)[B]
American Party 1969 Unknown 125[37]
Alaskan Independence Party Alaskan nationalism[38] 1978[39] 17,213
Socialist Party of America - Logo.gif
Socialist Party USA
Democratic socialism[36] 1973[20] 8,215 (ME/MA/NJ) [C]
Independent Party of Delaware logo.svg
Independent Party of Delaware
2000 7,316
Women's Equality Party of New York.png
Women's Equality Party
Feminism[40] 2014 7,207
Pirate Party USA Logo.svg
United States Pirate Party
Pirate politics[41] 2006 3,000
United Utah Party text logo.png
United Utah Party
Centrism[42] 2017 1,690
Serve America Movement Big tent[43] 2017 348 (NY)
Ecology Party of Florida 2008[37] 125[37]
Charter Committee logo.png
Charter Party
1924 Unknown
Liberal Party of New York Liberalism[44] 1944 Unknown
Workers World Party Marxism–Leninism[45] 1959 Unknown
Freedom Socialist Party logo (visible).png
Freedom Socialist Party
Socialist feminism[46] 1966 Unknown
Independent Citizens Movement 1968 Unknown
United Citizens Party 1969 Unknown
OSA-1A.jpg
Socialist Action
Trotskyism[35] 1983 Unknown
Grassroots—Legalize Cannabis Party Marijuana legalization[47] 1986 Unknown
Socialist Alternative (USA) logo.svg
Socialist Alternative
Trotskyism[35] 1986 Unknown [C]
Progressive Dane logo.png
Progressive Dane
Progressivism[48] 1992 Unknown
LaborParty2.gif
Labor Party
Social democracy 1996 Unknown
Christian Liberty Party Christian nationalism[49][50] 2000[51] Unknown
U.S. Marijuana Party Marijuana legalization[52] 2002 Unknown
Citizens Party of the United States Center-left politics[53] 2004[54] Unknown
Independent Greens of Virginia 2005 Unknown
Rent Is Too Damn High Party Anti-high rent[55] 2005 Unknown
Moderate Party of Rhode Island Centrism[56] 2007 Unknown
American Freedom Party White nationalism[57] 2009[57] Unknown
Humane Party Environmentalism 2009 Unknown
Sovereign Union Movement
Movimiento Unión Soberanista
2010 Unknown
Tea Party of Nevada 2010
Justice Party Progressivism[58] 2011 Unknown
Transhumanist Party Transhumanist politics[59] 2014 Unknown
Aloha ʻĀina Party Hawaiian sovereignty[60] 2015 Unknown
Working Class Party 2016 Unknown
Independent Party of Florida

Historical parties[edit]

Historical parties in the United States, with years active
Party Other names Ideology Created Disbanded
Federalist Party Classical conservatism[61] 1789 1824
Anti-Administration party Anti-Federalism[62] 1789 1792
Democratic-Republican Party (1792) Republican Party, Democratic Party Jeffersonianism[63] 1792 1825
Toleration Party American Party Secularism[64] 1816 1828
National Republican Party Anti-Jacksonian Party Classical conservatism[65] 1825 1837
Anti-Masonic Party Anti-Masonry[66] 1828 1838
Nullifier Party Nullification[67] 1828 1839
Working Men's Party Owenism[68] 1829 1831
Whig Party Traditionalist conservatism[69] 1833 1854
Liberty Party Abolitionism[70] 1840 1848
Law and Order Party of Rhode Island Charterites Anti-Dorr Rebellion[71] 1840 1848
American Republican Party (1843) Nativism[72] 1843 1854
Democratic-Republican Party (1844) Texas annexation[73] 1844 1844
Free Soil Party Abolitionism[74] 1848 1855
Unionist Party American unionism[75] 1852 1861
American Party (1844) Know Nothings Nativism[76] 1854 1858
Opposition Party (Northern) Abolitionism[77] 1854 1858
Opposition Party (Southern) Pro-slavery[78] 1858 1860
Constitutional Union Party Unionist Party Southern unionism[79] 1860 1860
Unconditional Union Party Unionist Party American unionism[80] 1861 1866
National Union Party Unionist Party American unionism[81] 1864 1868
Radical Democracy Party Abolitionism[82] 1864 1864
Readjuster Party Left-wing populism[83] 1870 1885
People's Party (Utah) Mormonism[84] 1870 1891
Liberal Party Anti-clericalism[85] 1870 1893
Liberal Republican Party Classical liberalism[86] 1872 1872
Greenback Party Currency reform[87] 1874 1884
Socialist Labor Party of America Workingmen's Party of the United States De Leonism[88] 1876 2011
Anti-Monopoly Party Progressivism[89] 1884 1884
People's Party (1892) Populist Party Populism[90] 1892 1908
Silver Party Bimetalism[91] 1892 1902
National Democratic Party Gold Democrats Gold standard[92] 1896 1900
Silver Republican Party Bimetalism[93] 1896 1900
Social Democracy of America Utopian socialism[94] 1897 1900
United Christian Party 1987
Social Democratic Party Democratic socialism[95] 1898 1901
Home Rule Party of Hawaii Hawaiian nationalism[96] 1900 1912
Socialist Party of America Democratic socialism[97] 1901 1972
Independence Party Independence League Progressivism[98] 1906 1914
Single Tax Party Land Value Tax Party, Commonwealth Land Party Georgism[99] 1910
Progressive Party (1912) Bull Moose Party Progressivism[100] 1912 1920
National Woman's Party 1913 1930
Nonpartisan League Agrarianism[101] 1915 1956
National Party 1917
Minnesota Farmer–Labor Party Populism[102] 1918 1944
Labor Party of the United States Social democracy[103] 1919 1920
Farmer–Labor Party Social democracy[104] 1920 1936
Proletarian Party of America Communism[105] 1920 1971
Workers Party of America Marxism–Leninism 1921 1929
Puerto Rican Nationalist Party Puerto Rican nationalism[106] 1922 1965
American Party (1924) Nativism[107] 1924 1924
Progressive Party (1924) Progressivism[108] 1924 1924
Communist League of America Trotskyism[109] 1928 1934
American Labor Party (1932) De Leonism[110] 1932 1935
American Workers Party Trotskyism[111] 1933 1934
Workers Party of the United States Trotskyism[112] 1934 1938
Union Party Distributism[113] 1936 1936
American Labor Party (1936) Social democracy[114] 1936 1956
America First Party Isolationism[115] 1944 1996
Progressive Democratic Party Progressivism[116] 1944 1948
American Vegetarian Party 1947
States' Rights Democratic Party Dixiecrats Segregationism[117] 1948 1948
Progressive Party (1948) Progressivism[118] 1948 1955
National Renaissance Party Neo-Nazism 1949 1981
Constitution Party (1952) Christian Nationalist Party Paleoconservatism[119] 1952 1968?
National States' Rights Party Neo-fascism 1958 1987
Puerto Rican Socialist Party Puerto Rican nationalism[120] 1959 1993
Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Desegregation[121] 1964 1964
Black Panther Party Black nationalism[122] 1966 1982
Patriot Party Socialism[123] 1960 1980
Youth International Party Yippies Anarcho-socialism[124] 1967 1967
Marxist–Leninist Party, USA Marxism–Leninism[125] 1967 1993
Red Guard Party Maoism 1969 1973
Communist Workers Party Maoism[126] 1969 1985
American Party (1969) Paleoconservatism[127] 1969 2008
National Socialist Party of America Neo-Nazism 1970 1981
Raza Unida Party Chicanismo[128] 1970 2012
People's Party (1971) Democratic socialism[129] 1971 1976
New Union Party De Leonism[130] 1974 2005
U.S. Labor Party LaRouchism[131] 1975 1979
International Socialist Organization Trotskyism[132] 1977 2019
Citizens Party Progressivism[133] 1979 1984
New Alliance Party Left-wing populism[134] 1979 1992
White Patriot Party Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan,
Confederate Knights of the Ku Klux Klan
White supremacy 1980 1987
Labor–Farm Party of Wisconsin Left-wing populism[135] 1982 1987
Populist Party (1984) White nationalism[136] 1984 1994
Grassroots Party Marijuana legalization 1986 2012
Illinois Solidarity Party Anti-LaRouchism[137] 1986 2007
Republican Moderate Party of Alaska Centrism[138] 1986 2011
A Connecticut Party Liberalism[139] 1990 1998
Greens/Green Party USA Green Committees of Correspondence Ecopolitics[140] 1991 2019
New Party Progressivism[141] 1992 1998
New Jersey Conservative Party Conservatism[142] 1992 2009
Independent Grassroots Party Marijuana legalization 1996 1998
Labor Party Social democracy[143] 1996 2007
Marijuana Reform Party Marijuana legalization[144] 1998 2002
Southern Party Southern nationalism[145] 1999 2003
Personal Choice Party Libertarianism[146] 2004 2006
Florida Whig Party Fiscal Conservatism[147] 2006 2012
Boston Tea Party Libertarianism[148] 2006 2012
Connecticut for Lieberman Centrism[149] 2006 2013
Independence Party of America Centrism[150] 2007 2013
Modern Whig Party Conservative liberalism[151] 2007 2018
Taxpayers Party of New York Conservatism[152] 2010 2011
Freedom Party of New York Progressivism[153] 2010 2011
Working People's Party Partido del Pueblo Trabajador 2010 2016
Traditionalist Worker Party Neo-Nazism[154] 2013 2018

Non-electoral organizations[edit]

These organizations generally do not nominate candidates for election, but some of them have in the past; they otherwise function similarly to political parties.

Political Party Founded in Former Titles International Affiliations
African People's Socialist Party 1972 Uhuru Movement
All-African People's Revolutionary Party 1968
American Nazi party (remnants) 1959 World Union of Free Enterprise National Socialists
National Socialist White People's Party
American Party of Labor 2008
Black Riders Liberation Party 1996[155]
Committees of Correspondence for Democracy and Socialism 1991
Communist Party USA 1919[156] International Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties
Communist Party USA (Provisional) Unknown
Democratic Socialists of America 1982 (merger of Democratic Socialist Organizing Committee + New American Movement) Formerly Socialist International, not a member as of August 2017.
Freedom Road Socialist Organization 1985 International Communist Seminar
Forward Party 2021
International Workers Party 1974
Movement for a People's Party 2017
National Socialist Movement 1974 American Nazi Party World Union of National Socialists
New Afrikan Black Panther Party 2005
New Black Panther Party 1989
News and Letters Committees[citation needed] 1955
Our Revolution 2016
Progressive Labor Party 1961 Progressive Labor Movement
Revolutionary Black Panther Party 1992
Revolutionary Communist Party, USA 1975 Revolutionary Union
Social Democrats, USA 1972
Solidarity 1986
Spartacist League 1966 International Communist League (Fourth Internationalist)
World Socialist Party of the United States 1916 Socialist Party of the United States
Socialist Educational Society
Workers' Socialist Party
World Socialist Movement

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ Additionally, the two independent Senators both caucus with the Democratic Party.[3]
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Votes counted in a fusion ticket.
  3. ^ a b Nominated a candidate associated with a different party.
Footnotes
  1. ^ a b c Winger, Richard. "March 2020 Ballot Access News Print Edition". Ballot Access News. Retrieved April 5, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "2020 Presidential General Election Results". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections.
  3. ^ a b "U.S. Senate: Party Division". United States Senate. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved May 12, 2019.
  4. ^ "Party Breakdown". House Press Gallery. House Press Gallery. November 29, 2018. Archived from the original on March 14, 2019. Retrieved May 12, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e "State Partisan Composition". National Conference of State Legislatures. April 1, 2019. Archived from the original on February 18, 2019. Retrieved May 12, 2019.
  6. ^ Segal, Cheryl (May 27, 2016). "5 things the Libertarian Party stands for". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 16, 2018. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  7. ^ Martin, Douglas (November 22, 2010). "David Nolan, 66, Is Dead; Started Libertarian Party". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 13, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  8. ^ "Elected Officials – Marshall Burt". Libertarian Party. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  9. ^ Harris, Tyler (December 14, 2020). "Maine State Rep. John Andrews Joins the Libertarian Party". Libertarian Party. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  10. ^ Winger, Richard (May 6, 2019). "Minnesota Independence Party Becomes State Affiliate of the Alliance Party". Ballot Access News. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  11. ^ "Elected Officials". The Alliance Party. Alliance Party National Committee. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  12. ^ "INDEPENDENT PARTY'S 2009 LEGISLATIVE AGENDA | Independent Party of Oregon". August 19, 2009. Archived from the original on August 19, 2009. Retrieved September 12, 2020.
  13. ^ "Senator Brian Boquist has left GOP, is now a member of the Independent Party of Oregon". Oregon Catalyst. January 15, 2021.
  14. ^ Meyerson, Harold (November 11, 2014). "Meet the Working Families Party, Whose Ballot Line is in Play in New York". Prospect. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  15. ^ "Howie Hawkins will probably be the Green Party's 2020 nominee". The Economist. March 26, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
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Further reading[edit]

  • Nash, Howard P., Jr.; Schnapper, M. B. (1959). Third Parties in American Politics.
  • Ness, Immanuel; Ciment, James (2000). The Encyclopedia of Third Parties in America. Armonk, NY: Sharpe Reference. ISBN 0-7656-8020-3.

External links[edit]