Amazonian motmot

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Amazonian motmot
Amazonian Motmot (Momotus momota) (38484878185).jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Coraciiformes
Family: Momotidae
Genus: Momotus
Species:
M. momota
Binomial name
Momotus momota
Momotus momota dist.png
Synonyms

Ramphastos momota Linnaeus, 1766

The Amazonian motmot (Momotus momota) is a colorful near-passerine bird in the family Momotidae. It is found in the Amazon lowlands and low Andean foothills from eastern Venezuela to eastern Brazil and northeastern Argentina.[2]

Taxonomy and systematics[edit]

The Amazonian motmot and the blue-capped (Momotus coeruleiceps), whooping (M. subrufrescens), Trinidad (M. bahamensis), Lesson's (M. lessonii), and Andean motmots (M. aequatorialis) were all at one time considered conspecific.[3][4][5] The Amazonian motmot has nine recognized subspecies; they are listed in the "Distribution and habitat" section below.[2]

Description[edit]

The Amazonian motmot's plumage varies among the subspecies. The bodies of all are shades of green. All have a long tail that has extended feathers with racquet tips that are green or black. Most have a black eyemask, though their size and shape differ. The central crown is black and surrounded or partially bordered by a blue band. The nominate subspecies has a chestnut nape. Momotus momota ignobilis and M. m. cametensis have more extensive chestnut on the neck and face.[4]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The Amazonian motmot is widely distributed in South America east of the Andes. Nine subspecies are recognized:[2]

  • Momotus momota momota - eastern Venezuela, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, and northern Brazil
  • M. m. microstephanus - southeastern Colombia, eastern Ecuador, and northwestern Brazil
  • M. m. ignobilis - eastern Peru and western Brazil
  • M. m. nattereri - northeasten Bolivia
  • M. m. simplex - western to west central Brazil south of the Amazon
  • M. m. cametensis - north central Brazil
  • M. m. parensis - northeastern Brazil
  • M. m. marcgravianus - eastern Brazil
  • M. m. pilcomajensis - southern Bolivia, southern Brazil, and northwestern Argentina

Throughout its range the Amazonian motmot inhabits the interior and edges of humid lowand forest. It is found up to 1,200 m (3,900 ft) in Venezuela, to 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in Ecuador, and to 750 m (2,460 ft) in Peru.[4]

Behavior[edit]

Feeding[edit]

The Amazonian motmot is omnivorous. It has been documented eating insects and other arthropods, small mammals and reptiles, and fruit.[4]

Breeding[edit]

Like most Coraciiformes, the Amazonian motmot nests in long tunnels in earth banks. Very little else is known about its breeding phenology[4]

Vocalization[edit]

The Amazonian motmot's song has been described as "a fast, hollow hoo-do" and "a bubbling whOOP-oo" [1]. It also makes "a gruff kak", sometimes in a series [2][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2016). "Amazonian Motmot Momotus momota". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016. Retrieved May 5, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Gill, F.; Donsker, D.; Rasmussen, P. (January 2021). "IOC World Bird List (v 11.1)". Retrieved January 14, 2021.
  3. ^ Remsen, J. V., Jr., J. I. Areta, E. Bonaccorso, S. Claramunt, A. Jaramillo, D. F. Lane, J. F. Pacheco, M. B. Robbins, F. G. Stiles, and K. J. Zimmer. Version 19 January 2021. A classification of the bird species of South America. American Ornithological Society. https://www.museum.lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.htm retrieved January 19, 2021
  4. ^ a b c d e f Orzechowski, S. C. and T. S. Schulenberg (2020). Amazonian Motmot (Momotus momota), version 1.0. In Birds of the World (T. S. Schulenberg, Editor). Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.2173/bow.bucmot4.01 retrieved May 5, 2021
  5. ^ Stiles, F. Gary (2009). "A review of the genus Momotus (Coraciiformes:Momotidae) in Northern South America and adjacent areas" (PDF). Ornitología Colombiana. 8: 29–75. ISSN 1794-0915. Retrieved May 5, 2021.