Talk:ActRaiser

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Plot[edit]

The plot section of this article needs some major cleanup. The grammar needs work, and it's full of run-on sentences. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.142.129.10 (talk) 08:45, 29 August 2009 (UTC)

Map[edit]

When you look at the map in an old Nintendo Magazine, the map is like North America: Ice and snow in the north. Mountains in the northwest and north (like the Rocky Mountains). Dessert in the south (Kasandora). The mountains east from Kasandora, are east from the dessert like the Appalachian Mountains. Bloodpool can be the great lakes, with the rivers. Fillmore looks a little like Labrador in Canada. Marahna is an island outside, like Cuba.

Don't get this part...[edit]

"The second boss of one village in the game is a false god--in actuality a demon with the head of a cobra--to whom the villagers have been praying." Gosh, I don't remember any cobra-headed false god demons. Is this Kalia? If so, Kalia didn't have a cobra head. He always struck me as wearing a turban, in the ending sequence when all the bosses (Plus the Tanzra Mask) are gazing at you on the pillar in Death Heim, Kalia looked human. Please confirm which boss this god is.

That's what I thought at first, but if you look carefully, he has the head of a hooded snake with very small eyes. --DragonAtma

According to scans of the manual, the false god boss is indeed named Kalia. And his head is a hooded serpent in the boss sprite, but looks human indeed at Death heim.
http://www.gamersgraveyard.com/repository/snes/manuals/scans/actraiser_map-b.jpg

--Sir VG —Preceding unsigned comment added by 12.193.142.10 (talk) 08:18, 13 October 2008 (UTC)

What does ActRaiser mean?[edit]

Havent been able to find out what Actrasier means. Any thought? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 70.142.26.172 (talk) 06:45, 8 February 2007 (UTC).

I think an explanation found at a Gamefaqs forum (https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/563502-actraiser/71288265) gives a decent explanation--each level is an Act, so the language is symbolic of a play. Being that in Japan it was called "Akutoreizā" (clearly a transliteration) and assuming that the game's name was invented in Japan itself, it was probably just selected by someone who thought the word sounded cool and it had the English word "Act" in it. Sort of like how "Fooly Cooly" sounds sort of English, but the name itself doesn't have any real meaning. The creator just chose it because they liked how it sounded, and it had the English words for fool and cool in it. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 50.35.73.19 (talk) 18:30, 13 February 2018 (UTC)

Original Research tag[edit]

I removed the original research tag in the section explaining the game's Judeo-Christian allegory as I don't think it's warranted. The introduction text from the japanese sequal explicitly states that the Master from the first game is God, and his opponent Tanzra is Satan.

One point to make about that...
You used the term holy allegory. It seems a little out of place. Allegory would be fine. Also, I don't remember the part where the master himself (of course he couldn't because he doesn't speak; but does the angel speak for the master?) And I thought the master was leaving the world with the intention of never returning, believing his work done. There seems to be a bit too much religiosity in that paragraph, and not enough objectivity.
It's OK to notice intuitive similarities and references, but connecting them to anything concrete, let alone political or ideological should be a cautious enterprise. It is true that the game is an allegory to Judeo-Christianity, however. Tcaudilllg 01:05, 29 September 2007 (UTC)
Actually, I would argue that the story takes a decidedly secular perspective. In the game, the people do many things without God's help, including (inexplicably) casting out demons. While the player must choose an option while in god mode to have the demons cast out, the angel always reports afterwards, "Master! The townspeople got rid of the demons without our help!"
Also, at the end of the game, the townspeople become too "advanced" to need religion. And as Tcaudilllg accurately reports, "the master was leaving the world with the intention of never returning, believing his work done." Christianity, on the other hand, teaches humanity's complete and constant need for God. The notion of "advancing" away from God is not only impossible in the Christian worldview, it's outright heretical.
Mind you, I'm not starting a religious debate here. My concern is accurately describing the worldview as portrayed in the game. I'd like to change the wording to say something to the effect of "This game mixes some elements of Judeo-Christianity with elements of secular philosophy." But I'm willing to hear other viewpoints on this. -- Tom H12 (talk) 18:15, 22 January 2008 (UTC)
See Wikipedia:Verifiability#Sources in languages other than English and Wikipedia:When to cite. ~ Hibana 02:02, 29 September 2007 (UTC)
"For he so loved mankind that he didn't care whether they believed in him or not..." 24.137.126.153 (talk) 01:11, 22 March 2008 (UTC)

Actually, I would argue that the story takes a decidedly secular perspective. In the game, the people do many things without God's help, including (inexplicably) casting out demons. While the player must choose an option while in god mode to have the demons cast out, the angel always reports afterwards, "Master! The townspeople got rid of the demons without our help!"

Its not decidedly unchristian to say demons can be cast out 'without God's help'. (emphasis in the text bellow was added)

John said to Jesus, “Teacher, we saw someone driving out demons in your name. We tried to stop him, because he wasn't a follower like us.” But Jesus said, “Don't stop him! For no one who works a miracle in my name can slander me soon afterwards. For whoever is not against us is for us. Truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you belong to Christ will never lose his reward.” - Mark 9:38

and also

“Not everyone who keeps saying to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will get into the kingdom of heaven, but only the person who keeps doing the will of my Father in heaven. Many will say to me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, we prophesied in your name, drove out demons in your name, and performed many miracles in your name, didn't we?’ Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Get away from me, you evildoers!’”

Its true the player must choose options from the menu, however, I don't think The Master's palace (in the game's fiction) is actually equipped with menus. As for the Angel's comments, either this is bad writing/plot hole, or purposefully done to emphasize that The Master is all-knowing and his angel is not.--76.191.180.179 (talk) 07:56, 10 April 2008 (UTC)

What I would really like to know, and I think it might help settle this confusion, is what religion was the games creators, and if not Judeo-Christian in nature, then where is the source of their information on the subject?--76.191.180.179 (talk) 08:01, 10 April 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Actraiserbox.jpg[edit]

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BetacommandBot 06:23, 27 October 2007 (UTC)


Religious Subtext?[edit]

Please, it just a fcking side-scroller. That section should be deleted. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 217.24.21.130 (talk) 16:14, 10 March 2008 (UTC)

It's actually the uncensored plot of the game. The entire game is God fighting Satan. So yes, they should delete the "subtext" part. --65.87.242.28 (talk) 21:05, 25 February 2009 (UTC)


Difficulty of PAL Version[edit]

I was just playing the PAL version of the game (on a US SNES), on the "Beginner" difficulty setting that you can select in the PAL version. However, I found it to be a lot harder than the US NTSC version. In the PAL version, in the final fight, I was getting hit for a lot more damage than I was in the US NTSC version (which I double checked by playing the US NTSC version on an emulator). Unfortunately, I can't find any source on the web that corroborates this, but if someone else can it might be worth adding to the article. 86.161.246.174 (talk) 00:03, 17 August 2010 (UTC)

About version differences...[edit]

This article states that the "Professional" mode in the North American edition of this game is equivalent to the action sections in the Japanese edition. This is not true.

I have no evidence to offer; just speaking from personal experience.

The Japanese action stages are very different, mostly because there are more enemies. In some cases, the enemies even look or behave differently, or require more hits to eliminate. There are also a few cases of minor differences in stage layout. However, there are still enemies that only require one hit to eliminate, and the Japanese version of "Professional" mode modifies the action stages in the same way as the North American game (i.e.: monsters that only took one hit now take two).

While I'm on the subject, other unique characteristics of the Japanese edition I've noticed include:

Your score is always reset to zero when you die. Even in "Professional" mode.

The status window that shows how much you scored in Act I and Act II of each area doesn't exist.

It takes less of a population to max out the player character's level. This is offset by the fact that the maximum possible population seems to be less than the North American version, for reasons I have yet to figure out. (Correct me if I'm wrong.)

Blue Dragons and Red Demons in the city-building part of the game take one less arrow to eliminate. I also get the impression that the monsters in these areas are more aggressive and less likely to hang around monster lairs.

Miracles have different SP costs.

The hourglass cycle is slower.

Earthquakes do not destroy all low level buildings and spare all high level ones. It just destroys some buildings (of any kind) at random.

Magic in the action stages is used by pressing up + Y. Spells also consume different amounts of MP.

The player's character takes more damage when hit (I think).

Spikes cause instant death instead of minor injury.

Some of the power-ups in the action stages are different. Most notably, there are not as many 1UPs.

...and probably a few other things I'm forgetting offhand. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ensleepent (talkcontribs) 03:39, 7 March 2011 (UTC)

well, that's why i made sure to say "level design but with the changes of the american version", heh... but i suppose enemy patterns go under level design too. i tried to mention a lot of things you have, since they came up in this preliminary research. the point is, the article has more good information right now than it had before. of course, now i don't know where to put things like the magic command being different, the section already looks scary enough... if i were allowed to, i'd probably write a separate sub-article on the version differences, haha.
the way max population works in the us and later versions is strange enough... for some reason i think it's got something to do with stage segments having a higher time limit. at any rate, from what i understand, it's NOT offset much at all, and it's a LOT easier to get up to level 17 (or at least i think you can still go up to level 17). i'm going to assume sim miracles cost more in the us version? if this whole "sim segments being harder" thing is at all consistent... 75.177.119.25 (talk) 13:09, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

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Arcade?[edit]

I don't know the specifics, but I do remember playing a version in the arcade that was just the platforming sections. 75.67.11.201 (talk) 14:08, 5 June 2019 (UTC)Patrick